On Valentine’s Day

Lack of access to insulin is the most common cause of death for children with diabetes in many countries around the world. In fact, in some parts of the world, the estimated life expectancy of a child who has just developed diabetes could be less than a year.

This Valentine’s Day our community can help change that.

Through the Spare a Rose, Save a Child campaign, we raise awareness and donations for Life for a Child, an International Diabetes Federation program which provides life-saving diabetes supplies, medication, and education that children in developing countries need to stay alive.

Spare a Rose, Save a Child is simple: buy one less rose this Valentine’s Day and donate the value of that flower to children with diabetes. Your loved one at home still gets flowers and you both show some love to children around the world who need it.

One rose, one month of life. A dozen roses, a year of life for a child with diabetes.
We’re hopeful that you will embrace this cause this year.

Spread the word!

Do you Strip Safely?

Imagine your life depends on knowing a number. Imagine you have the tool to find what the number is, and based on this number you have to follow the rules or you may end up in big trouble—and by trouble I mean death. I’m not joking… this is what people with millions of people with diabetes are dealing with now.

It is sad and scary to learn that there is no proper regulation for the manufacturing of certain types of glucose testing strips, which leads to inaccurate numbers… very inaccurate. If you have diabetes, and you’re on insulin, you may either over-treat or under-treat a rather complicated condition; and don’t forget insulin is a very dangerous drug. Too much, too little… NEVER a good thing.

Imagine you’re the parent of a child with diabetes and you need those numbers to be accurate so you know what is the right thing to do. Imagine you give your child more insulin than what they really need. Or less. Inaccurate readings are every person with diabetes’ nightmare, and that is one of the things we keep hollering about. One would think that after all the hollering we would be heard. But that isn’t the case

According to Strip Safely:

At a recent public meeting the FDA acknowledged that there are some 510(k) cleared blood glucose (BG) meters and strips that do not meet the accuracy standards for which they were approved. There is currently no clear course of action to insure people with diabetes are using blood glucose strips that meet regulatory requirements.

Then you have a person like me, who is not on insulin, and whose doctor recommended to test 2-3 times A WEEK (that’s a story for another day). If I already have a hard time getting an idea of how my diabetes behaves, you can do the math when it comes to a meter that isn’t giving me accurate numbers. The problem is, which one do I trust?

Last month, David Edelman posted a Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison chart. It isn’t the only one I’ve seen lately. Well known brands of glucose meters are barely making it, and they are well regulated by the FDA. What about those who aren’t? The “cheap” ones that will make you spend more money on complications at the end of the day?

And you must be thinking what you can do about the accuracy issue and ask for stricter regulations from the FDA when it comes to something as vital as adequate blood glucose level readings. Well, YOU GO TELL THEM!

Contact your congress person and make a DEMAND for stricter regulations from the FDA. Diabetes isn’t a joke. Glucose meters aren’t a toy. And we aren’t puppets.

Taking the High Road

Wouldn’t you know it… there are instructions for this: Take a deep breath. In for five, out for five. Close your eyes to get the full effect. Repeat if necessary until you feel like you’re back into control. Then smile. Look the person directly in the eye and give them a knowing smile. Usually, people find this disarming and want to smile back. Sometimes, this is all it takes.

When it comes to health conditions and each individual’s experience, there will always be someone who doesn’t agree with me. And lately I’ve found myself trying hard not to say something, especially about people with type 2 diabetes. Somehow we’ve been deemed the fat and lazy who deserved to get diabetes; the media doesn’t help and opinion are so divided, I really don’t know right from wrong anymore. I know my personal history, I know I probably could’ve delayed the onset of my diabetes, but the magic cocktail was there for me to develop it. Whether I deserve it or not… that’s another story.

One of the things I struggle the most as diabetes advocate is trying to make other people in the community understand that because I have type 2 it doesn’t mean I have no awareness about other types of diabetes. The constant bashing of type 2s makes me really sad sometimes, and I wish other people wouldn’t be so quick to judge and condemn. Things have gotten to the point that it’s bad that we’re all called diabetics. But that’s a rant for another day. What I’m trying to say is, that in the middle of this struggle, I decide to take the high road and keep on doing what I’m doing: caring, helping, educating.

Sometimes it’s better to smile and keep silent.

Type What?

I’ve been thinking a lot before posting this. I even picked some people’s brains, mostly type 2’s. I don’t want to offend anyone or sound resentful. It’s just that sometimes I feel so invisible because I have type 2 diabetes… and apparently I’m not the only one. We’re kinda the ones “responsible” for our condition, and even though I know many people in the diabetes community don’t make the difference between all types of diabetes, there are still many others who think we don’t have to deal with “that much” and that we’re a bunch of irresponsible wimps with no character. After all, eat better, exercise, lose weight and your diabetes will be gone… *poof*, right? NO, not right.

If you’ve seen me you’re probably thinking I would get rid of my diabetes if I just lost all this darn weight. But you probably don’t know that I do have a very significant hormonal imbalance. After 10 years I finally was informed of a possible cause for my condition. Not that I didn’t know my hormones are the crankiest on earth, but the fertility doctor added PCOS to the equation. And I think the PCOS is as old as I am… completely ignored and untreated and here I’ve been thinking why I just feel crazy. But I digress… what I’m saying is that sometimes it’s not that easy. I’m not saying it may be not that easy for me (my major problem is my difficulty to gather the will power to do what’s right), but I don’t like generalizations. And when type 1’s hate on type 2’s, that is just not right.

I realize that part of problem may be just in my head. And I know no one else judges me the way I judge myself, so most of the things I believe people think are only in my head. But I wanted to write about this and see if I get some input. I spend a lot of time advocating for ALL types of diabetes and I don’t think anyone would appreciate if one day I decided I’m just going to care about type 2.